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Photo: Peter Lechner / HBF

October 28, 2014

Barbara Hohn receives Austrian Honorary Medal, Silvia Arber the City of Basel Science Award


Barbara Hohn, Group leader emeritus of the FMI, was honored with this year’s Austrian Honorary Medal for Science and Art. This is the highest honor that the Republic of Austria awards to outstanding scientists and artists. Silvia Arber was honored with the City of Basel Science Award 2014 for her excellent academic achievements.

Barbara Hohn was born in Austria in 1939 and studied chemistry at the University of Vienna. After postdoctoral work at the Universities of Yale and Stanford, and the Biozentrum of the University of Basel, she joined the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research in 1978 as a Group leader. She is perhaps best known for her work into the stress-induced epigenetic changes in plants. In 1996 she was appointed as Adjunct Professor at the University of Basel.

Barbara Hohn has received several awards for her research, including election to the Austrian Academy of Science (2006) and the Royal Society (2008). She received both the Ludwig-Wittgenstein-Prize (2010) as well as membership to the Austrian Curia of Science and Art (2013). On October 24, 2014 she now received the Austrian Honorary Medal for Science and Arts, the highest honor Austria awards, from the Austrian Federal President Heinz Fischer.

Recipients of the Austrian honorary medal are members of the Austrian Curia of Science and Art, and their number is limited to 18 Austrian and 18 international personalities. New members are elected by the curia, their membership is confirmed by the Austrian Federal President.

On October 28, 2014, Silvia Arber has been awarded the City of Basel Science Award 2014 by the Executive Council of Basel. The prize is bestowed annually on a researcher who has excelled through outstanding academic achievements at the University of Basel.

Silvia Arber, who works both at the FMI and the Biozentrum of the University of Basel, studied biology at the University of Basel and graduated with a doctorate conducted in Pico Caroni’s lab. For her postdoctoral studies she moved to Columbia University in New York. She returned to Basel in 2000 to a joint appointment at the FMI and the Biozentrum. Since 2008, Silvia Arber is a Full Professor of Neurobiology and Cell Biology. She is interested in the motor system and how circuits of neurons engage in the control of movement. She has received numerous awards including this year’s Otto Naegeli Prize.

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